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Oppression

 William Lloyd Garrison (1805 – 1879)

"There does exist and has existed for a generation, an internatonal network which to some extent operates the way the radical Right believe.  In fact, this network, which we may identify as the Round Table groups, have no aversion to cooperating with the Communists.  I know it exists because I have studied it for 20 years and was permitted for two years to examine its papers and secret records.  The ultimate aim is to establish a system in which the individual’s freedom and choice will be controlled within very narrow alternatives by the fact he will be numbered from birth and followed by number through his educational training, required military or public service, his tax contributions, his health and medical requirements, his financial and retirement and death benefits."

Excerpt from the book "¨Tragedy & Hope: A History of the World in Our Time" by Dr. Carroll Quigley, professor of history at Georgetown University, and mentor of Bill Clinton.

William Lloyd Garrison, a white man,  worked tirelessly for the emancipation of black slaves.  Garrison spoke passionately and eloquently, using a classic language and direct style in speeches and writings.  His fearless conviction and resolution and his opposition to tradition and societal bias should be set as an example for Light Workers who are working now for the emancipation of humanity from the Oppressive Dark Forces that control the planet.  His vow, given below, should be yours but with a different light and focusThe fight to manifest the Light of the New Age.  So Mote It Be!

According to Brother Phillip (George Hunt Williamson) in his book "Sacred Places of the Lion", William Lloyd Garrison is a reincarnation of Akhnaton, the Pharaoh of the XVIII Dynasty in Egypt who worked for the people’s emancipation from the bondage of Amunism.  He was also a benevolent King who allowed a Lesser Exodus from Egypt of the Hebrew people.

"Born in December 12, 1805, in Newburyport, Massachusetts, Garrison, from a white family of moderate means, became an apprentice to the editor of a newspaper when he was only thirteen. Soon after his apprenticeship ended, he and a young printer named Isaac Knapp bought their own newspaper, the Free Press. One of their regular contributors was John Greenleaf Whittier, later to become known as the poet laureate of abolition. Garrison’s dedication to the abolition of slavery was already apparent; on the fiftieth anniversary of the country, Garrison said, "There is one theme which should be dwelt upon, till our whole country is free from the curseSLAVERY." The paper lasted only six months; when it folded, Garrison went to Boston, where he worked as a printer and editor until he was offered a position in Baltimore, as co-editor with Benjamin Lundy of the Genius of Universal Emancipation.

"While in Baltimore, he was sued for libel by the owner of a ship that transported slaves. Garrison had called him a highway robber and a murderer. He was convicted and sentenced to six months in jail; he served only seven weeks, when money was donated to pay his fine.

 "On January 1, 1831, Garrison, back in Boston, published the first issue of The Liberator, the conclusion of his editorial left no doubt as to his intentions:

"I am aware that many object to the severity of my language, but is there not cause for severity? I will be harsh as truth, and as uncompromising as justice. On this subject, I do not wish to think, or speak, or write, with moderation. No! No! Tell a man whose house is on fire to sound a moderate alarm… but urge me not to use moderation in a cause like the present…

"I am in earnest I will not equivocate I will not excuse I will not retreat a single inch AND I WILL BE HEARD."

He was a member of the Great or World Council and the Council of Three, and a member of the Order of the Rose, conferred upon him in England in 1834.

William Lloyd Garrison passed to transition on May 24, 1879.

  

William Lloyd Garrison, from the publication “The Liberator: ‘To the Public’ ", January 1, 1831:

Oppression! I have seen thee, face to face,
And met thy cruel eye and cloudy brow;
But thy soul-withering glance I fear not now

For dread to prouder feelings doth give place
Of deep abhorrence! Scorning the disgrace
Of slavish knees that at thy footstool bow.
I also kneel —but with far other vow
Do hail thee and thy horde of hirelings base:

I swear, while life-blood warms my throbbing veins,
Still to oppose and thwart, with heart and hand,
Thy brutalising sway —till Afric’s chains
Are burst, and Freedom rules the rescued land,
Trampling Oppression and his iron rod:
Such is the vow I take —SO HELP ME GOD!

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And thus is my vow too: To oppose the brutal control of the Illuminati Bankers’ claws over the oppressed peoples and to make Liberty, Abundance and Love flourish in the rescued New Earth.  Such is the vow I take  SO HELP ME GOD!  Luis Prada

Other website with information of William Lloyd Garrison:
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p1561.html

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